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Candidate Logo Design

Campaign Logos, Political Design, Graphic Design

Candidate Logo Design

Candidate logo creation during election season is in most ways the same as designing logos in the corporate world. You need to know your client, what their goals are, where they’re from, and what image they are trying to convey to their intended audience. What you don’t have when designing candidate logos during election season is time.

Instead of spending months on research and development, you have hours or if you’re lucky, maybe a few days to take what the candidate or political consultant gives you and create a candidate logo that will grab the attention and stay in the minds of the voter. The pressure is on because it has to stand out and be distinctive during a hectic time of information overload and short attention spans.

When I design a candidate logo, my number one goal is to incorporate a unique element and use it in a way that ensures that this logo isn’t a carbon copy of the ones used by his or her opponents. It can be subtle, like the oak leaf used in Kevin Corbett’s logo for his race for Oakland City Council and the apple incorporated into Coby Pizzotti’s name for his race for school board.

Once in a while, though, I have the opportunity to utilize something that is unique not only to the candidate, but the area he or she is campaigning in. I did this for Louis Dominguez and his race for California State Senate. Mr. Dominguez was running in Senate District 35, in the Los Angeles area, which happens to be the home of one of California’s most distinctive landmarks, the Vincent Thomas Bridge. He wanted to incorporate not only the bridge, but the blue and red lights that run along it’s suspension cables and towers.

The challenge: how to distill such a complicated structure into a clean and simple logo that would be easily recognizable to those living in the area. No small feat, and by far one of the most challenging campaign logos I’ve ever worked on. All three logos did the job, and were able to be easily used by the candidates in all their campaign materials.